Virtual Global Engagement Activities

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Pitt Global Hub will be collating a list of free virtual activities in which students, faculty, staff and any individual interested in international or global affairs can participate! This list will be updated regularly. 

Students who are working on completing the Global Distinction can report their participation in these events via myPittGlobal and submit for approval towards their requirements. Please be sure to include a short 1-2 sentence summary or attach proof of participation in the activity (e.g. screenshot). 

Updated 3/30/2020

Ongoing Activities

  • Politics/International Relations
    • United Nations Noon Briefings
      • Meetings coverage and press briefings on various topics from the United Nations. These are lengthy articles that take about 15-20 minutes to read. The UN releases them almost daily.
    • US State Department Press Page
      • Press releases, briefings transcipts, and Secretary Pompeo's speeches. Updated regularly.
  • Arts & Culture
    • Virtual Museum Tours
      • View some of the world's best museums from the comfort of your home!
    • Barnes Takeout: Your Daily Serving of Art
      • In short videos, The Barnes Foundation curators, scholars, and educators present off-the-cuff musings about some of their favorite works in the collection. Take a break during these trying times, and refocus your mind on something calm and nourishing.
    • DC Environmental Film Festival Online (through March 31st, 2020)
      • The Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital (DCEFF) is the world’s premier showcase of environmentally themed films. Since 1993, their mission has been to celebrate Earth and inspire understanding and stewardship of the environment through the power of film. With the cooperation and support of their filmmakers, they are excited to be able to offer you a selection of our 2020 Festival schedule — most of which are absolutely free to stream (with some exceptions). Available through March 31st.
    • New Israel Foundation Film Club
      • NIF is offering a virtual film club, bringing you poignant and relevant Israeli films during these days when we have more time to catch up on films we may have missed, ones we want to see again, or completely new ones. Watch the movie at your own convenience before the Tuesday discussion.
      • Every Tuesday at 4PM
  • Other
    • Duke University Press - Navigating the Threat of Pandemic Syllabus
      • In support and solidarity during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are providing free access to the books and journal articles in the above link to help build knowledge and understanding of how we navigate the spread of communicable diseases. Listed books are free to read online until June 1, 2020, and journal articles are free until October 1.
    • Pitt Meditation Club Weekly Meetings
      • The Pitt Meditation Club is hosting weekly Zoom meetings on Wednesdays at 7PM to discuss, teach, and practice varieties of meditation. The Zoom code is: 620 611 861.
    • ARTSC1000 - UCIS Professional Development 
      • Meeting online every Wednesday at 3PM through April 15th. Contact Angela Illig (ami17@pitt.edu) for more information.
      • Designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students to establish a career direction and formulate a strategy for securing a full-time position in today's competitive international and global workplace. Students focus on developing specific competencies that include career selection, jobsearch activities, resume and cover letter development, professionalnetworking techniques, behavioral interviewing skills, and workplace ethicsin preparation for government, business, and nonprofit sector careers. ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND WORKSHOPS.
    • Five Colleges Center for East Asian Studies - Archived Webinars
      • The Five Colleges Center for East Asian Studies (FCCEAS) has a list of archived webinars on a variety of topics connected to East Asian studies.

Virtual Events​

  • Language Standardization and Hougen Resistance in Touhoku, Japan: 104 years since the Japanese state formally designated a standard spoken language, Edwin Everhart argues that standardization is still an active process. Focusing on language of the Touhoku region, Everhart describes how some language users resist the hegemony of standard language and the discourse that local dialect is obsolescent, ugly, or backward. Drawing on ethnography, interviews, and archives of "language activists" from the last thirty years, he argues that this resistance can be understood in terms of the techniques and metaphors that activists use to legitimize their local language. In many cases, these rhetorical tools—for example, emphasizing the deep historical roots of dialect—are the same tools used in national language standardization. This duplication reveals part of why projects of national and local identity can be equally elusive: they rely on exclusion and erasure.
    • March 31st, 2020 | 12PM
    • Join via Zoom link above
  • The Role of Applied Math in Real-time Pandemic Response: How Basic Disease Models Work: It's not normally instantly obvious what mathematicians do. It's also not normal to be able to use middle-school math to help try to save the world. Right now, things are not normal. Join us for this live presentation explaining how very simple, middle-school math (and much fancier versions of the same thing) can help us fight COVID-19. The presentation will include time for Q&A. Webinar given by Dr.Nina Fefferman, Professor of Mathematics, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Tennessee.
    • March 31st, 2020 | 3:30PM
    • RSVP via Zoom link above
  • UCIS International Career Toolkit Series Presents: Peace Corps Info Session: Ryan Stannard is a regional recruiter and former teacher collaboration and community service volunteer. We are opening up the UCIS Professional Development Class to offer additional students to take part online and learn from Ryan. Ryan will discuss his current and prior work in the Peace Corps, requirements for future employees, and key strengths and skills he seeks in Peace Corps applicants. He'll also answer questions.
    • April 1st, 2020 | 3PM-3:50PM
    • Sign up via link above
  • The Call of The Sirirí: Birds, Humans, and Sound in Post-Agreement ColombiaAfter the signature of the peace agreement between the Colombian Government and the FARC-EP guerrilla in 2016, different Colombian institutions have promoted avitourism, a form of eco-tourism based on birdwatching, as an economic activity that can revitalize local economies after decades of conflict. International institutions and NGOs have pointed out that avitourism simultaneously generates income, empowers local communities, and encourages the conservation of fragile ecosystems. However, avitourism also relies on an epistemology of sound imbricated in notions of difference that separates nature and culture, a binary that allows the commodification of biological diversity to fuel neo-extractivist “green industries.” This presentation introduces an analysis of Ana Maria Romano’s “El Suelo Desde el Viento” and Edson Velandia’s “El Cli-Cli-Clí de Paro” to explore an alternative epistemology of sound connecting culture and nature, human and nonhuman, who coexist in a way that one becomes a part of the other. Such study presents the Colombian case to explore the limits and biases of the uses of notions such as biodiversity within neo-extractivist economies in the Global South, while points to the necessity of understanding and respecting the meaningful ways how different peoples interact with the nonhuman beings around them.
    • April 1st, 2020 | 4PM
    • Join via Zoom link above
  • Film Screening & Panel Discussion: The Silence of Others: As part of the ESC's Year of Memory and Politics Series, we will hold a virtual screening of The Silence of Others. The film reveals the epic struggle of victims of Spain’s 40-year dictatorship under General Franco, who continue to seek justice to this day. Filmed over six years, it follows victims and survivors as they organize the groundbreaking “Argentine Lawsuit” and fight a state-imposed amnesia of crimes against humanity, in a country still divided four decades into democracy. Following the screening, a panel discussion will be held featuring Pablo Fernandez-Vazquez (Department of Political Science), Cristina Blanco Sío-López (Marie Sklodowska Curie Senior Global Fellow), and Jae-Jae Spoon (Department of Political Science).
    • April 2nd, 2020 | 3:30PM-6PM
    • RSVP via Eventbrite link above
  • Webinar Series: Confronting Force Migration & Violence in the Americas
    • ​Voices from Abya Yala (The Americas): Realities and Resistance: In the Kuna people’s language, Abya Yala means "mature land," "living land," or "blossoming land" and refers to America. In the first panel, organizers from Guatemala and Colombia reflect on the impacts of neoliberalisms, extractivism, state violence, forced migration, and the pandemic within their communities and throughout the Americas. We will also discuss how communities and social movements are resisting and organizing to safeguard their rights, dignity, and territories in this context.
      • April 4th, 2020 | 12PM-1PM
      • RSVP via link above
    • Countering Anti-Migrant Narratives and Media Work: Panelists will discuss how narratives are used to both highlight and conceal the nuances of forced migration and US interventionism. We will also discuss the role of the media in creating narratives that criminalize and dehumanize communities of color and the emergence of new narratives developed by migrants and asylum seekers.
      • April 4th, 2020 | 1:30PM-2:30PM
      • RSVP via link above
    • Impact of COVID-19 Crisis on Migrants at US-Mexico Border: The coronavirus has grabbed headlines in local and international media. However, we have heard little about the disproportionate impact of this pandemic on the most vulnerable communities. In this webinar, we will discuss the situation facing asylum seekers on the US-Mexico border and how local communities are responding to these challenges.
      • April 4th, 2020 | 3PM-4PM
      • RSVP via link above
    • Researching U.S. Militarization of Borderlands and Mesoamerica: How do we access information on the US gun trade, Mexican military forces, and how they impact human rights violations? How can we translate hard data on militarism for social media use and to change policy? In this webinar, veteran researchers guide us through how to access information on US-sourced weapons in Mexico and Central America.
      • April 5th, 2020 | 12PM-1PM
      • RSVP via link above
    • Policy Advocacy on U.S. Militarism and Guns in Mexcio and Central America: This webinar draws on the extensive experience of two effective policy advocates regarding gun policy and US policy in Honduras to respond to the following questions:  What  policies impact violence and arms trafficking in Mexico and Central America? Are the gun industry and militarists using the current crisis to promote harmful policies? How can we engage legislators in Washington to change those policies?
      • April 5th, 2020 | 1:30PM-2:30PM
      • RSVP via link above
  • Socialism: Past, Present, and Future Pop-Up Course
    • Socialism for RealistsForty years ago, Margaret Thatcher declared that “there is no alternative.” State socialism was dying and capitalism, restructured as neoliberalism, was ascendant. The collapse of state socialism in 1991 seemed to hammer the last nail into socialism’s coffin and vindicate Thatcher’s prophecy. Fast forward to today—socialism is back. However, the road to socialism is not easy. Today’s socialists cannot simply be dreamers. They must also be realists. This live interview with Sam Gindin will discuss the need for socialists to establish popular confidence in the feasibility of a socialist society and the pragmatic steps we can take to get there.
      • April 9th, 2020 | 2PM-3:30PM
      • RSVP via Zoom link above
    • Everyday Maoism in Revolutionary China: Communist revolution in the 20th century was reliant on a profound change in individual consciousness. It is not surprising that communist ideology spoke forcefully and often about creating “new people.” Revolutionary China was no different. But how did Chinese communists at various levels, from Mao Zedong to village cadres, understand their work to transform individual consciousness? What did “Maoism” mean in the everyday? This live interview with Aminda Smith will explore the profound and personal changes in individual’s consciousness through multiple points of contact between individuals, the state, the Party, and its propaganda apparatuses.
      • April 16th, 2020 | 2PM-3:30PM
      • RSVP via Zoom link above
  • FCCEAS Upcoming Webinars